A Conversation with Vallerie Muthoni

-Kahvinya singing in the background.-

FLOABS: Should I mention the context of where we’re doing this?

Vallerie Muthoni: Yeah sure sure.

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How did you know J.Kali?

I’d always been a fan first of all, from the beginning. And then we kinda met a few times. Y’know, and then he followed my music and I followed him back. There’s a time – actually, at a very recent performance – we met and had a really intimate conversation where he really just advised me. I was very isolated. I was in a deep dark place and I wasn’t talking to people, but he was like “Yo, we’re talking before you leave,” and we sat on the grass.

So through the short experience I had with him, and now all these things I’m hearing: you’re seeing all the people who’ve shown up for him, you see his love. Sorry this a lot-

It’s fine, go on.

I’m so happy I met him at the time I did because he’s made an effect on so many people after his death. So many people who know “We have to do this for him.” It’s a beautiful thing to see.

Alright, onto you. Are you a singer or a rapper?

I really wanted to be a singer like Beyonce…is that Terrianne?

-Terrianne Iraki on stage singing “I was here by Beyonce.”-

-We listen to Terrianne for a few minutes.-

Sorry, where were we?

Beyonce.

Yeah I started out wanting to be a singer, and then I started rapping and people loved it. And it’s fun, it’s easy for me to do honestly, so I’m both. I embrace them both.

And when did you start singing or rapping?

Girl, I’ve been singing since I could talk.

Rapping, I’d always do poetry in high school. I’d do little raps in high school, and then I toa-d No Chances and I was like “Oh, people are fucking with this shit. I’m so dope.”

Taking no chances.

Taking no goddamn chances.

Vallerie Muthoni 1

Can say that’s when you started taking this rap thing seriously?

Yup. No chances. And then Brown Suga came and I was like “For sure”

For sure you’re a rapper.

For sure.

This is your first full length project?

Yes.

How many tracks?

5. It was gonna be 8, but we made it 5.

You cut it?

Yeah.

Why?

Quality over quantity. I had a conversation with MDQ a few hours ago, it just helped me understand and see some things.

Are you excited / nervous?

I am! I think so.

VALLERIE

What’s the one message you want to be the takeaway from your album?

There’s a song at the end of the album called ‘End Rape Culture’. It’s a story but just something that’s happening so often and something that frustrates me.

I could never articulate how I feel. I was never the type to post on Twitter or Facebook. Music was just the way that I could get that message out there. It’s one that makes you think a little bit.

Tell us about your songwriting process.

The minute I hear a beat; the first 30 seconds of a beat I’ll know if I like it. Singing wise – I kind of first freestyle a little bit, see where it goes; whatever vibe I go with, and then from there I can just stop and say “Okay I like where this is going” and write it down.

I use paper to write my songs ’cause a lot of artists these days actually use their notepads.

Yeah, on their phones.

Also I was on Kabambe life for very long so I didn’t have much of an option.

What producers did you work with?

Kahaelbeats. Fvzzkill. MANU-

Avionix?

Khasakhala?

I think that’s him.

He’s has so many aliases, I’m like “MANU pick one dammit.” It’s a five track EP, it’s not much. And then one international producer.

Do you remember your first live show, and how that felt?

Does high school count?

Yeah.

No, that doesn’t count. I’ll talk about the first one after school, when I finished highschool and I knew I wanted to take this music thing seriously. It was at Alchemist, of course. That was my first proper live show with a band. I took my friends – I was studying music production at ADMI.

You did ADMI?

Yes, for two years I did a diploma in music production. I had friends who could play guitar and drums and I was like, “Ay, let’s do this.”  It was actually The Lounge, remember YLM’s [Yellow Light Machine] event The Lounge that used to happen every so often?

Yeah. ylm

It was really dope. I enjoyed myself. I loved it. It’s usually when I’m on stage, I’m comfortable. I’m not nervous anymore.

What’s the most recent “Ohmigod is this real life” moment?

I’m so overwhelmed with happiness because I just got featured in True Love Magazine. And Colors did a feature on Brown Suga. And the Freshman HBR list.

colors

So you’ve basically made it. Why are you still hustling with the rest of us?

Manze no. Until the money comes, then I’ll start saying I’ve made it. Until then, I’m still a struggling artist.

What inspires you?

I don’t want to die doing something I don’t like, and I love performing so if I can get to a place where I’m no longer stressing, sijui fuata-ing who for money, and I’m just performing & traveling around the world. That’s what motivates me. That’s what inspires me. That’s what I’m doing it for so I can get to that place. Does that make sense?

It makes a lot of sense. Who are your biggest influences?

Beyonce. Anderson .paak. Michael Jackson. Masego.

Uncle Sego.

It will happen. And you’ll find him mysteriously missing after his show. Don’t ask questions.

VALLERIE 2

I will not ask. We’ll know where he is. 

Burna Boy. Childish Gambino.

In Kenya? 

Muthoni the Drummer Queen. Blinky Bill.

Cool. Any last words?

The Wavey Soul on Mookh.

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Vallerie Muthoni is a Kenyan songstress and rapper. You can purchase/stream her debut EP The Wavey Soul here:

Buy: Wavey Soul on Mookh.

Stream: Apple Music, Spotify

 

The Wavey Soul: Vallerie Muthoni

I believe in the power of tides and waves. I believe the moon controls the tides and waves and since human beings are 70% water, the moon controls us too. We have that in common with the sea. Wavey souls gang gang, let’s dive into and under Vallerie Muthoni’s debut EP, The Wavey Soul. 

  1. Waves Never Die (Intro)

The static when you first switch on the television, back in dem days. A V.O.K public broadcast.

vok

I am the ocean the sea there is a world inside of me

The poetry is finger-snapping powerful.

What a cinematic ride. I’m in a dark cinema, popcorn on my left, soda on my right, squeezing the arms of my seat, goosebumps washing over me as the first scene begins.

She sounds like Ursula except in this version of The Little Mermaid, we’re rooting for Ursula. And if Ursula was Beyonce and Beyonce absorbed Jay-Z’s spirit for herself, thus making her more powerful (Ed: if that’s even possible).

As powerful as the ocean, as beautiful as the sea. 

As a PFC (Person from the Coast), I approve of this ocean-themed message.

 

2. Me, You & The Sea

Waaavvyyy. I’m surfing 70’s Japanese technicolor VCR waves. It’s a vibe.

Is this about God? No, it’s about love. A love by the sea.

Beat switch.

Her vocals are stripped down, it gives it a live performance feel, oscillations lapping at our ears like we’re barefoot by the ocean, digging our toes in the soft warm sand.

I’m homesick.

 

3. Brown Suga

I love it when she raps. Don’t get me wrong, I like it when she sings. But I love it when she raps.

Like heaven’s favorite angel drank too much Henny and smoked the dankest of blunts. Brown Suga is sweet angelic Lucifer with fire in his soft golden eyes.

Flow- hard. Lyricism – hard. Beat – full hard-on.

Shout out to Bongo Sawa – wavey apparel for the wavey soul.

Those 808’s banged me upside my head, I wasn’t not ready, who produced this? Imechizi kama Mathare {Ed’s note: Kahael beats}

 

4. Lover’s Game (feat Harawa)

Who produced this? It caught me off-guard, tripped me off my surfboard.

Why is it so hard for people to be consistent with their vibe? Just keep it real all the time and don’t make games out of people, is that so hard? (Raw nerve)

Harawa enters like slow trickling honey. Bryson Tiller and 6lack had a baby and named him Harawa: a prince.

Damn, that harmony.

Harawa’s husky crooning and Vallerie’s thick nectar stew vocals on top of each other taste like a BLT with all the right sauces. (Shout out to honey mustard).

In that last chorus, they’re talking to each other. Each one has their reason for why things went wrong but still, they crave that closure; the need to ask him / to ask her “How did we get like this?”

Ah yes. The extreme euphoria or the unsettling resentment of romantic love.

 

5. End Rape Culture

The title is culminative. It brings this film to a close. If you don’t leave this EP with anything, at least leave with this.

Where’s that sample from? {Ed’s note: It’s a T.D Jakes Sermon}

It’s a story. A sad story.

Life is an ocean- I’ve known this all along. The ocean is beautiful, the ocean is immense, the ocean exists in different parts and in vast multitudes.

The ocean is salty the ocean stings. The ocean is choppy. The ocean can kill you without mercy. The ocean can consume you.

Tl;dr – Consent.

It’s all a test.

It’s almost like its an experiment. God’s experiment. 

When are we going to understand that we were put on earth to love?

 

 

You can purchase The Wavey Soul EP off of Mookh here

Also,wavey soul launch

Tupac and Notorious B.I.G: A Kenyan Millenial’s Perspective

“Why do you even give a fuck about two American rappers who died the year you were born? Si you write a piece on Lil Pump?”

A friend’s little brother, born after 2000, posed this question to me.

When I was a child growing up, Tupac and Notorious BIG were constantly referenced in the Friday Pulse, my older brother and his older friends had near fist fights on who was a better mc. I’d watch Poetic Justice with my sister and Channel O would bump either ‘Juicy’ or ‘Changes’ on every throwback countdown.

If this is indeed a quarter life crisis- insisting that everything from my childhood has to mean something, let’s start with my brother’s gangsta rap music.

Esketit then.

The word going round when I first heard about this East Coast/West Coast beef was that Biggie killed Tupac and then Tupac’s mom killed Biggie. I think the houseboy told me this version, and then he taught me how to bend my fingers to make the Crips gang sign.

“Bloods wanakuchinja kama mbuzi. Crips watakutafuna kama Krackles.”

-Edwin the houseboy.

As hard as I know Afeni Shakur was, I mean, she was a black panther – it doesn’t get any more consciously hardcore than that.

NY 21 Afeni shakur

But even at 6, that sounded a little far-fetched.

Turns out, no one really knows who the perpetrators in both murders were. A cold case.

Moreover, turns out their beef was primarily the result of a series of misunderstandings and colliding male egos.

‘Pac and Big met somewhere in ’93 and were boys for the most part- they smoked weed, ogled machine guns and shared meals. Who knows, maybe if they’d hugged it out over Henessy and a bowl of Green, Pac would be on his 12th Studio Album. Biggie would be getting a BET lifetime achievement award, and they’d both be accorded the same reverence as the likes of Dre, Snoop and Nas.

Instead, these raging bulls taunted each other.

After Tupac was shot 5 times at the Quad Recording Studio lobby, Biggie dropped ‘Who Shot Ya?’, poking the injured bear like a bored cackling witch. Now, I’m not gonna speak with certainty as to whether or not Biggie ordered the hit on Pac, but seeing an open window- he couldn’t pass up an opportunity to throw shots.

“East Coast, motherfucker (Who shot ya?)
West Coast, motherfuckers
West Coast, motherfuckers, hah!”

‘Pac took this track as confirmation that Bad Boy were the ones who sent the hitters his way, telling Vibe magazine in one interview that  “it came out too fast…”.

In retaliation, Pac takes a picture with Faith Evans in the club, Big’s girl at the time, and uses that as his below-the-belt ammo, claiming that they smashed.

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That’s why I fucked your bitch you fat motherfucker

Let’s put this in context now.

I asked an African American friend who lived in New York and was attending a HBU at the time about this because by virtue of age and race, he was present in the geographical and social context of that whole drama. It didn’t shake his life, not even a jiggle.

In his words, “The East Coast and West Coast are so far away, you can say ‘Fuck the East Coast’ from L.A and then what? Who’s going to fly from New York to find you and shoot you?”

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This is an entire continent y’all

 

  1. Somewhere in Dandora. A bunch of young men are paying close attention. Kalamashaka is comprised of three members: Johnny Vigeti, Kama and Oteraw.

It started out as as imitations of American Mc’s in terms of their rugged flow and punchlinez kibao lyrical style.

The same way hip hop started as a social reflection of what’s happening in the ghetto, Kenyan hip hop became a reflection of life in the slums. English switched out for sheng. Dandora becomes Brooklyn. Police harassment stays the same.

  1. Rev. Timothy Njoya is wilding on the streets and in church, raging against the Nyayo machine. Moi is president again, going on his 19th year. Political tension sizzles like a wet fish on hot tarmac. K-shaka drops ‘Tafsiri hii’. Kenyan hip hop begins.

Tafsiri hii, maisha kule D ni mazii ninalia nikitumia M.I.C

Tafsiri hii, ingawa tuko chini bado tunatumaini. Sikiza kwa makini

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As Tedd Josiah said in the documentary Hip Hop Colony, “the hip hop beats met the Swahili lyrics.”

  1. Matatu culture is rising strong. Ogopa Deejays are dominating the club scene, dropping hit after party hit and setting the tone for the new millennium.

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The street prestige that came from associating with Ogopa Deejays is similar to the pride that came with rolling with either the Death Row or Bad Boy Records. The parties, the liquor, the girls- the staple of both.

A young man from South C wants to be a part of this. He finds himself in a room with Kenya’s reigning producer, Tedd Josiah, this is his chance. Tedd listens to the boy rhyme and then kicks him out of the studio. Who does this kid called E-sir think he is? The Swahili Tupac?

And just like his American predecessors before him, E-sir dies at his prime leaving behind his footprint on Kenyan hip-hop that can never be wiped; that can never fade.

Basically, if it wasn’t for Bad Boy and Death Row we wouldn’t have had Kalamashaka or E-sir, all of whom still stand in history as part of Kenya’s greatest emcees. We wouldn’t have Octopizzo, we wouldn’t have Camp Mulla or Khaligraph and his New York accent.

At least, we wouldn’t have them in the way that we have them/ have had them.

You see, it all comes full circle. Dunia ni Duara. It was all a dream.

BIG

beerbongs and bentleys: Post Malone

Quote: “If you’re looking for lyrics, if you’re looking to cry, if you’re looking to think about life, don’t listen to hip-hop.”

Remember when we collectively pointed our pitchforks away from Kanye, for a second, and pointed them at Malone?

When his caucasity became the center of his career?

Does this white mumble rapper from Texas know about the true meaning of hip-hop?”

But in a way, Post Malone was right. Hear me out.

If you’re looking to cry, if you’re looking to think about life then don’t listen to hip-hop. Listen to beerbongs and bentleys. There’s a difference.

Post Malone is a circle trying to fit into the square that is hip-hop.

I’m going to dive right into this with ‘Stay’. Listen to it more than once. In fact, listen to it a couple of times.

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Just like ‘Leave’ from his debut album, Stoney. ‘Stay’ sees him brandishing his acoustic guitar and, subsequently, we watch his hear melt onto the floor. Don’t get it twisted. ‘Stay’ may sound sweet on the surface but it’s gut-wrenching. He sings 2 ad libs away from bawling like a man-baby.

You put your cigarette out on my face

‘Over Now’ is the worst way to break up with someone. It’s venomous. He’s spitting poison at her with angry circa-Kevin Rudolph guitar riffs slashing through whatever was left of that relationship. In a phrase, “fuck you”.

I’ma put that bitch pussy in a motherfucking bodybag

You kept your heart on the counter in a Prada bag

Now, have you noticed how much Black rappers complain about their money? Think about it:

  • “Mo’ Money Mo’ Problems” P. Diddy and Mase.
  • ‘All Falls Down’ Kanye West.
  • ‘Real Friends’ Kanye West.
  • The tragedy that is ‘Speedin Bullet to Heaven’ Kid Cudi.
  • Drake. . . All the time.

The way I see it: White musicians tend to relish in their new found fame or say nothing about it (Mike Posner being a popular exception). I don’t know. Maybe I don’t listen to enough white rappers.

Post Malone is the bridge. He’s a white rapper complaining about his new money problems like a black artist. Hence ‘Rich and Sad’.

The song is exactly what it says it’s about. Lil’ Posty is a sad Ritchie Rich, crying in his Maybach, tears as cold as the ice on his rings.

I just keep on wishin’ that the money made you stay

So on one hand, he hates his new-found fame and wealth. But at the same time, he relishes in it. Like the twins, in “Zack and Codeine” we find Malone living his best life. If the Tipton was a trap house, that is.

The fast life is a rolling hill. The highs have breathtaking views. The lows are the sunken place. MDMA, but perpetually.

zach and codeine

“Candy Paint’ has a nursery rhyme flow, but it’s rude AF. I’d totally have rapped along to this in class 3, giggling like I’m in on a naughty secret.

Beerbongs and bentleys plays like your wildest dreams over a blunt and a sunset with your stoner friends and then having all those things come true.

And a sunset has never felt the same since.

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Cool Kids Only: DJ Mkuzi

This interview was recorded on 29th November 2017 and published on 22nd January 2018.

 

FLOABS: Where are we?

DJ Mkuzi: Hi, my name is Mkuzi. We are in Mombasa at Moonshine Beach Bar.

 

When did you know you wanted to be a dj? Like when were you first interested and when did you decide yes, I want this to be my life.

I think I’ve always been interested in music. The more I grew up, the more the burning desire grew inside me. Anything music related was just my thing. I always wanted to be a producer, I always wanted to be a dj and I’m so happy that im pursuing everything that I’m doing right now. Regardless of what I’m doing on the side, this is the one thing that drives me to wake up everyday; it excites me everyday.

 

How did your family react when you first told them about what you want to do?

I remember I was with my bro and my mum, straight out of high school. They asked “what do you want to be?”

I told them i wanted to be a producer and my bro laughed. He laughed so hard. He couldnt believe it. It got me scared kidogo, but as I kept growing up I kept on growing my confidence. They didn’t take it well. My older bro still doesn’t take it well right now as we speak despite the achievements that I’ve made but hey, one day as it comes. I guess one day they’re gonna realize how great of an achievement it is for me just to do my thing and be happy with it.

Talk about Mkuzi the DJ vs. Mkuzi the producer.

Mkuzi the producer is that sound that I really want to get out there, and it’s really inspired by my culture. I’m Mijikenda- Rabai to be specific and I think we have some really amazing music. I went up there, to the village, and just listened to those guys do their thing and I want to get it out there, make it cooler than it already is. Take it places. It deserves to be out there, enjoyed by everyone else, not just locally.

mkuzi 5

 

Mkuzi the dj is a different dynamic. He kills it on stage all the time. He plays what people like- what’s fresh. He’s a cool kid.

 

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DJ Mkuzi at Diani Beach Festival 2017/2018

Real quick: Cdj’s or Controllers?

Cdj’s everyday. Yeah, controllers make things work a little bit easier but I think it’s just how I learnt. I learnt on cdjs and you have so much more control over what you do. There’s no guess work, let me just put it that way. If you see someone killing it on cdj’s, they really are. They dont need any help with anything, it’s just them expressing themselves musically.

And what’s your overall favorite piece of gear?

Favorite piece of gear, my headphones. These are my babies. Pioneer Hdj-C180. I would never appreciate music the way I do without a good pair of headphones.

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DJ Mkuzi (left) at Earthdance Nairobi 2017

What do you think about the music scene in Mombasa? What does it mean to be a house dj from Mombasa culturally speaking.

It’s tough. In the beginning, it was quite a challenge. Literally playing for no one. But I’ve put in a lot of work. This year especially, I’ve had the privilege of working with like minded individuals who also DJ. We formed the 808 crew, namely: me, Himmy K, Rathod and AQce. 

808 poster

As a collective, we’ve achieved quite a number of things and we’ve got other people who also want to come aboard and I think 2018 is gonna be bigger and better – watch out for that space.

I think we inspire most people out there to get out of their comfort zone and y’know, not just listen to what their used to listenening or what’s being given to them, but go that extra mile to look for good music and appreciate it. That’s our point. It was hard in the beginning but it’s looking up, it’s looking really good.

What does the art of dj-ing mean to you?

The art of dj-ing means being able to express the music that you want to play to someone and not in the same way that it’s been given, if you can manipulate it or add something extra to it it, even if you don’t do any of those- just playing the right music at the right time, the right jams at the right vibe. That’s it.

If you can make someone just a little bit happier, make someone remember something from the music you’ve played, make someone forget all the problems they might be facing or going through – that for me is the most important thing.

Do you ever play songs you’re not feeling, just because it’s a crowd favorite? How does that make you feel?

I’ve played songs I am not feeling, many times I’d say. You just have to look at who you’re playing it for. Like I said, if it’s gonna make someone a little bit happier or someone is going to get a little bit more content just from hearing something that they enjoy, it doesn’t necessarily mean that I have to enjoy it.

Maybe it’s in a language that I don’t understand. Maybe that’s the reason I don’t enjoy it. As long as it’s making somone happy- that’s the most important thing. Don’t always look at it from your side, look at it from the other person’s point of view. If it’s making it better for them to enjoy their night, making it a little more pleasant for them, then why not?

Who are your influences internationally and in the Kenyan music scene?

Black Coffee. I used to play with the idea of being a dj but I really didn’t do anything about it for quite a long time until I saw Black Coffee doing his thing. There he was dj-ing with one arm and you could see he was going places. Each and every day, I kept looking up to him as he kept on growing bigger and bigger. That was one thing that gave me the extra push to just get out there and do my thing because I literally had no excuse- here’s this guy doing it with one arm. I started off and I took each day as it came. I still look up to him, he’s scaling higher heights than he was back when I decided to do this. One day I hope to grace a stage he’s played in.

Black-Coffee

Black Coffee

Locally, basically just the whole 6am crew. Drazen, Kuzi, Foozak, Suraj. They’re doing great things, they’re the pioneers of electronic music in Kenya. They’re growing bigger. Hopefully, one day I’ll be able to get to where they are. Maybe even surpass it.

What does the future look like for Mkuzi? What are some of the projects you have coming up?

The future is looking good, so bright. Right now, I’m just prepping for the Diani Beach festival. I’m in Diani in December from the 26th to the 1st.

By the end of the first quarter of 2018 I should have an EP out. I think there’s gonna be a lot of production on my side. A lot of gigs as well, but personally I’m just keen on the production. There’s gonna be some really cool stuff in 2018. I’ll keep you posted.

 

Peter Mkuzi is a fast rising dj/producer in the Kenyan house music scene. He is a member of the DJ/Producer collective, 808, and is based in Mombasa.

Follow DJ Mkuzi on Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/mkuzi

Follow DJ Mkuzi on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/djmkuzi/

Slide: BNRD ft. Mankind, Nomad

 

I used to think that alternative R&B was a genre I made up in my head. Something that sounds like R&B but think Babyface meets Octopizzo. So for anything that doesn’t fit into this well constructed box of genre, you get assigned the prefix ‘alternative’.

I don’t mind at all. In fact, I would like to exist in this alternative universe where this music is considered mainstream. It must be a pleasant universe with no black outs and fountains of pinot noir.

BNRD, Mankind and Nomad and blazing the trail for Kenyan chill-hop. The production on this is so meticulous, each percussion hit, the way it pans like the sounds are dancing around your head. All of it is intentional.

Plus the music video is the flyer for the wavy carefree Kenyan boy experience. It makes me want to smoke trees and kick it with these guys. And I guess that’s just the point- Life makes you feel bad enough, just let your music make you feel good.

 

SLIDE_BNRD_ft_Mankind_Nomad

No Chances: Vallerie Muthoni (prod. FireOneSam)

Ghai. She bodied this. This is the kind of fire that  spontaneously combusts you because you-did-not-see-it-coming. Dead bodies everywhere in the streets.

Vallerie Muthoni: Kenyan songstress. Kenyan rapper. She has come to snatch the hair off our scalps. Who is a 21 Savage? Who is an A$AP Rocky? Put her on an XXL Freshman Cypher now.

Don’t you love it when a person knows what they want and goes for it no apologies? Add a hard 808 to that and the world is yours Toni Montana.

Not a rapper tho.

Still bodied your favourite rapper tho.

Try not to burst into flames on the first listen.

on any block

Listen to Vallerie Muthoni’s Soundcloud here.

Stream No Chances by Vallerie Muthoni here.

Trip: Jhene Aiko

WhatsApp Image 2017-10-27 at 6.12.27 PM

Trip is a 4 sided dice that never stops rolling and you never know which side it will land on.

Side A- grief; the loss of a loved one. Side  B- experimenting with psychedelics. Side C- falling in love. Side D- falling out of love.

It’s about losing yourself and finding yourself all over again.

This project arrived with a masterful short film in which Jhene plays a fictionalized version of herself: Penny the Poet.

And how could I review something called Trip, without sprinkling some trippy imagery here and there?

Enjoy the trip.

drugs 1

 

We open with grief and psychedelics in ‘LSD’. Jhene’s brother, Miyagi, passed away in 2011 after battling cancer. On this track, she talks to him and tells him about her experience with the drug. How that tiny piece of paper made her feel closer to him, almost like she could talk to him and he’d talk back.

Everything you said I shouldn’t do
But those things bring me closer to you,

So the other night, I
Took a tiny piece of paper and put it under my tongue
This white guy said it’d be fun, and it was, but
What I saw
Oh my God, oh my God

‘Jukai’ is a forest in Mount Fiji, also known as suicide forest, where people go to die peacefully, amongst the sea of trees. She relates this forest to escapism; her need to run away to a place where she can never be found.

In an interview on Beats 1 Radio, she broke it down like this:

One night I was in [the studio] with the Fisticuffs and we were partaking in marijuana and we were watching a documentary about Aokigahara, the suicide forest in Japan. My great-grandmother was born in Hawaii, but she’s actually Japanese. My grandfather is Japanese, too. So I’ve always wanted to go. After my brother passed — actually, my whole life — I’ve been very interested in death. Not afraid of it, but interested and intrigued. I was watching that [documentary] and it was such a beautiful forest. Maybe people go there and they just feel at peace. Of course, everyone has different reasons for making that decision.
It’s definitely a place I’ve been in my mind: ‘Hmm, if I were to decide to do that, how would I do it?’ So we started with a guitar and I wanted to write a song about that place and go there in my mind. I know that sounds morbid, but it was true. It was a fantasy of me going there. It’s not super obvious in the song, but I say how my feet keep touching the ground [and] it’s not working for me. Then I’m saved by a guy. But in real life I was on a hike in Big Sur and I was getting emotional. Then I looked up through the trees and I saw the sun. It felt like the sun saved me, which, in itself, is [symbolic]: the Son of God or the sun in our solar system. It just felt like a love story.

‘While we’re young’ and ‘Moments ft. Big Sean’ are a summer of falling in love- with someone else, with yourself, with life. All guards and inhibitions thrown to the wind. The free-est you’ve ever been. ‘Only Lovers Left Alive’ is an upbeat pop synth number about fighting for that same love.

‘When we Love’. When falling into a love that seems too good to be true, be mindful- it just might be. It usually is.

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But seriously, who is this man who keeps giving her drugs. Big Sean, is it you?

She gives us something for the aux in ‘Sativa’ ft. Swae Lee. Staying true to the substance theme, if this song was a drug (I know, it’s called Sativa), it would be lean. It’s a drowsy eyes-closed slow-bumping banger.

‘New Balance’ is a heartfelt poem, originally posted on her tumblr, dedicated to finding that someone who will patiently help you heal all your wounds. Guitar courtesy of John Mayer.

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‘You are here’ is getting to know this person deeper and finding out who they really are. Yeah this is fun but are you sure? Are you sure you won’t hurt me? The same sentiments are echoed in ‘Newer balance freestyle’

Shit hits the fan in ‘Never Call Me’ and her eyes are wide open now. She sees it, she sees that it wasn’t really love. It was mostly just drugs. Also taking this opportunity to land a few jabs at her ex-husband, producer Dot-da-genius.

So let’s stop pretending like we were in love
We never shared anything but the drugs
We were both numb, never had anything real between us

Ironic because the next track in the album is produced by Dot da Genius. ‘Nobody’ is learning how to be alone again. However, the drugs switch from psychedelics to prescriptions, partly at fault is Dr. Chill.  (Dr. Chill’s identity will be revealed shortly). How the issues in her life are mostly resolved with a “Here. Take this. It will make you feel better.”

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Okay, so far we’ve met Lsd, Sativa, and prescription pills. ‘Overstimulated’ is coke.  The highs are short and fleeting. The come downs are cruel and unforgiving. Her addiction is rising. It’s an enchanting R&B feel and we get to swirl through Jhene’s mind along with her. She talks to the drugs like they’re a bad lover.

Why you never stay for long? You always go so fast
Who’s gonna hold my hand when I’m crashing

She’s coming down in ‘Oblivion’. That feeling of emptiness after it all ends. When nothing can fill the void. This one is my personal favorite- the sounds wave in and out of each other and the reverb makes it all the more ethereal and heavy. Everything from the percussion to Dr. Chill’s verse is a hovering darkness.

I love how direct she is in ‘Psilocybin’. Incase you had any doubts, yes. She is talking about shrooms. It’s calming (the song not shrooms idk I’ve never tried it) like a mantra i’d recite to myself to remind me I’m here. This is where I am and exactly where I am is exactly where I’m supposed to be. It is the right place. It is the right time.

Dear Dr. Chill, how have I lived without your smooth jazz wisdom all this time? Someone please give this psychedelic man a record deal and an NPR Tiny Desk Concert. (Right. Dr. Chill is Dr. Chilombo a.k.a Baba Jhene)

dr chill

I’m from the Universe soul
We’re all from the Universe soul 

Mummy and baby sing together on ‘Sing to me’ ft. Namikolove, her daughter. It’s as adorable and endearing as you think it is. Scratch that, it’s more. The beauty and vulnerable power in the image of a mother-daughter duo vs. the world moved me to tears in a feeling I haven’t felt since I finished watching Gilmore Girls.

The album moves through the stages of grief, finally ending in acceptance with ‘Frequency’. A prayer and a thanksgiving. And ‘Trip’ ft. Mali Music. Love pays but it also collects taxes. *shrugs* It’s a trip.

Life is a trip. Death is a trip. Family is a trip. Love is a trip. It’s all a constant unending journey. Breathe it all in, look around, learn, keep moving forward.

 

Rated : 4.3 / 5

 

 

 

Silk Noise Reflex: James Tillman 

Does everything feel like it’s going to shit? Does your life suck right now? Do you feel like no matter how hard you try it isn’t getting any better and you just can’t catch a break?

James Tillman got you. Take this sonic vacation with him. Escape in 4/4 into his silky world of dreamy electro-acoustic nu-jazz. Urban Lounge Music for the depressed and the stressed.

It’s so titular: Silk Noise Reflex. Silky and noisy in the finest ways; a reflex reaction of his emotions, the way one would normally react to what the world has to throw at you. Mellow and breakbeat. His falsetto is sweet and he sprinkles his percussions the way one would sprinkle salt, sparse but present. 

The moral lesson of each track can be summed up in a sentence. For example:

‘Rat Race’ = Slow down.
‘Death of a Star’ = sorry we couldn’t be together it’s no one’s fault.
‘Ms. Urbane’ = let it go.
‘Ms. Malaise’ = you make me happy
‘Human behavior’ = who are you to feel this way? Things happen to everyone everyday. No one’s feelings matter more.
‘Self Portrait of a New Yorker’ = why am I such a loner?
‘Tabloid theory’ = why am I still not happy?
‘Missed encounters’ = I just want to meet up and spend time with you

At night, the stars like fairy lights against the midnight blue backdrop. Drink wine and forget your woes, James will help you. 

Rated: 3.7 / 5

Finding clarity: Janice Iche

Floabs: Who do you think you are, Janice Iche?

Janice Iche: I think if there’s just one word that would describe me: it’s artist. Growing up and getting older, I’m using my brain more than I was and being more conscious and present. I’m learning many lessons, finally seeing the reason why things have been the way they’ve been since I was young, and there’s a reason I’m like this because I just have to be like this, y’know? By like this I mean-

Janice Iche-

Yeah.

Who do you want to be?

An artist, and I’m happy about this. I’m happy because everything I do is now productive in one way or another and it contributes to every piece of art that I want to make. I realize that I’m not just a musician, I’m so much more there’s so much more that I want to do and now I’m realizing why I’ve been wanting to do all those things and that makes it feel even more special.

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Why?

Because every single different art form has its purpose, but they all just merge into one. Growing up, I always felt very singular; it was always just me, especially in my teenage years. I felt different from everyone else, but all those experiences I had when I was by myself contributed to the person that I am today and I think it’s because I’m appreciating the person that I’m becoming. I’m starting to love it and I finally love myself. It’s exciting.

I’m accepting everything that I’ve seen and experienced in my life, and how they make me the person that I am today. It’s a very strong emotion and I’m happy about it. Literally, my heart is racing talking about it!

A friend once told me that I’m an empath because I feel very deeply and I feel other people’s emotions as well, and sometimes you don’t even know whether they’re your own emotions. Most times, they aren’t- because with your own emotions you always have this piece of yourself that you’re able to maintain.

I’m having so much fun in my life right now, discovering all these things and-

Discovering yourself-

Yes, and what I want to do. Everything is clearer. I know exactly the woman that I want to be and I’m actively going for it. It feels amazing.

Sometimes, I wish it would hurry up and get there but I know you’re supposed to enjoy the journey and well, it’s always gonna be a journey.

Why did you start JaniceIcheblog?

I realized that there’s so much that I want to create and share and I needed a platform to do that. Besides my music, everything I write is going to be on the blog. I also realized that I can use my vulnerability as my strength: I’m a very sensitive person and for the longest time, I’ve been having trouble dealing with the emotions that I carry; pretending that I don’t have these emotions when these emotions dictate every single day of my life. So I’ve been figuring out how to use these emotions to my own benefit. Instead of letting them keep me sad, I can turn it around and use them to my own advantage.

First of all, because I hate feeling alone- I want to show other people who also might be feeling alone that we, basically, have no reason to feel alone. Being open with our experiences and being able to share them gives us a sense of community as human beings, because we’re going through human experiences and human emotions but for some reason, everyone’s pretending not to have these emotions and experiences which are such a part of being human and being at this age and being a woman or being a man.

These are things that are common, but then everyone’s pretending like they don’t have these emotions then everyone feels like they’re alone. I don’t understand why that has to be and I don’t like it. I didn’t want to feel alone so I don’t want anyone to feel alone when they’re people out there who feel the same way.

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That’s why I started the blog: I wanted to be open, I wanted to be raw, and I wanted to be honest. I want to stop pretending like these things don’t exist- they exist. Why are we still pretending?

And it’s not like pretending is doing us any good. Everyone is depressed because no one is talking about their issues openly and genuinely. I guess I also want to show that genuine people do exist and there really is no need to feel like we’re alone because we’re going through the same thing. I wanted to spread awareness on the importance of being open and how transformative and revolutionary it can be.

Who are your influences?

My influences are black women who are going after their dreams and just being themselves fearlessly: Hannah Faith because she’s a sick dj, Solange, Oroma Elewa, Sza, Lee Litumbe, Yagazie Emezi. These black women who are just doing things and are at a level that I want to get to.

Where do you draw your inspiration from?

These same women.

And when I see someone’s work online and you can tell that they’ve put in so much love, effort, dedication and passion. When I see this work, it inspires me and I’m like, “I have to do the same thing. I have to put my all into it.”

Also, all the bad ass bitches near me who really motivate me and inspire me. Alexis Nereah because she has created her own path and she’s living it and it’s working out for her. It just goes to show how if you’re passionate about something and determined, it’s bound to work out.

Darina Anstis. She’s creating her own beauty standards and going with it fearlessly not giving a fuck about what anyone will say and it’s beautiful and she’s beautiful.

Lyra Aoko because she’s a boss ass bitch, simply.

My cousin Mary, who’s another boss ass bitch going after what makes her happy and stable.

My mom too.

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So what does the future hold for janice iche?

A lot. My music: I’m still writing music. That’s the one form that I feel has to be perfect so I’m really taking my time with it, but the future is going to be me with albums and performing on worldwide stages and at the same time, indulging in other forms of art which I am finding my place in.

Janice Iche is a singer-songwriter, a feminist, and an activist against emotional abuse. You can find out more about her at https://janiceicheblog.wordpress.com 

You can listen to her music at https://soundcloud.com/janiceiche

 

Images by : Adrian Kumli 

Lust For Life: Lana Del Rey

Is there such a thing as wasted love?

Lana del Rey, the Lady of Sadcore, is smiling for the first time in her life and that’s (sort of) the theme of this album. That she can smile when she wants to; that although it may be gloomy most of the time, it’s not always frowny faces and cigarettes. Sometimes it’s sunshine and flowers and that’s okay too.


This newly-flexed smile muscle also comes with features, there really is a first time for everything. Lana gets by with a little help from her friends: The Weeknd, ASAP Rocky and pleasant surprises like Sean Lennon and Stevie Nicks.

In the title track ‘Lust for Life’ featuring the Weeknd and his beautiful harmonies, it could either mean that they’re too good to die this young or that they are ready to die now at the prime of their youth and careers, however they’re not very good people so much to their dismay, their punishment is life.

Or that the only thing keeping them alive is their love, rather- lust, for living. They want it that bad. The song plays out like a suicide pact between lovers. Regardless, it’s sweet.

They say only the good die young
That just ain’t right

‘Cause we’re having too much fun
Too much fun tonight

 

Now, is there such a thing as wasted love? Sure, it might be misguided, ugly, regrettable even- but is it ever purposeless, without reason nor lesson?

Stevie and Lana don’t seem to think so in ‘Beautiful People Beautiful Problems’. A poem; a prayer- for their well of love to never run dry, and to never drown them. Amen.

But when I love him, get a feeling
Something close to like a sugar rush

It runs through me, but is it wasted love?
(Let’s not waste it, love)

In an interview with Pitchfork, she talked about being intimidated by Stevie Nicks and her legendary voice. Stevie called Lana’s breathy voice ‘her little echo’. It wasn’t condescending. On the contrary, Lana nearly fan-girl died.

“…I felt a little more exposed in that moment. But she was like, “That’s you. You just be you.” 

True enough, as soon as Stevie starts singing I can hear that Fleetwood Mac on the record player, warm, calm and honest.

My heart is soft, my past is rough

‘God bless America(and all the beautiful women in it)’ comes complete with patriotic gun fire. God bless ‘Murica but more importantly, bless its beautiful women.

It’s eerie how much Sean Lennon sounds like his father -maybe you’ve heard of him? His name was John, he sang in a little band from Liverpool called The Beatles- in ‘Tomorrow Never Came’. Can voices be hereditary? Do I have the same voice my grandmother had at my age? Or her grandmother? 

It’s sad and wistful: of star-crossed lovers who thought they’d be together someday, one day. But that day never came. What’s even more eerie is that it sounds like it was written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. 

She dips her foot into the hip hop universe with two ASAP Rocky features on ‘Groupie Love’ and ‘Summer Bummer’ showing us just how much she isn’t afraid to try new things. This is all becoming too much.

About ‘Coachella – Woodstock in my Mind’, and before you cry blasphemy and sacrilege, listen. Believe it or not, Coachella is the millennial’s solution to not being alive for Woodstock. I feel the FOMO every time someone says 1969, everytime I listen to The Jimi Hendrix Experience. Lana addresses the critics that tore her down after that damning Saturday Night Live Performance, as well as after the release of her previous studio album, Honeymoon. She relishes in her slow mastery of the art of not giving a fuck, and finally starting to enjoy her new life, not as Lizzy but as Lana.

I applaud her attempts at diversity and as heavy as it is, this project does feel generally lighter than most of her previous works. But still, what’s Lana without a little melodrama?

Image: Consequence of Sound

Rated: 3.7 / 5

Relaxer: Alt J 

With every release, Alt J seem like they’re falling deeper and deeper into the rabbit hole with no wish to return to the surface. I get it. The surface is lame.

True to it’s name, Relaxer is a sedative shot to the veins: Listen. Breathe.

It’s honest and vulnerable and washes over you like gently crashing waves such as in ‘Adeline’ and other times, like ‘Hit Me Like That Snare’, it’s gritty and anarchist and they shout, ‘Fuck you!’ But Alt J are far from nihilistic and random. Every single lyric means something. Even when it means nothing, that in itself means something. 

The general theme of this album is wishful thinking- it’s about loving someone you can’t be with. Lost love. Forbidden love. Unrequited love. Alt J frequently like to revisit this topic of a love that cannot be or one that is doomed to end in disaster. Remember the cinematic story of Gerda Taro and Richard Capa in the intoxicating ‘Taro’ from their debut project An Awesome Wave? They were both killed while documenting war. It was not a happy ending.

In ‘Adeline’, the Tasmanian devil cannot be with Adeline. Personally, I think it’s because he is a marsupial and she is human. Regardless, he is perfectly content with watching her swim under the Kodachrome blue sky. He wishes her well.

Ooh, I wish you well
I wish you well
I wish you well
I wish you well

As I listened to ‘House of the rising sun’, I saw the blazing sun burning a hole against the burnt orange sky, over a creaky house somewhere near the edge of the horizon. Mother cannot be with father. The day of reckoning is close. We shall all pay for our sins. 

Joe tells us what he did every month of last year until his untimely death in December in the song ‘Last Year’. The months pass. Life floats away. 

If I were to sum up this album in a few words:

Fuck you

I’ll do

Anything that I wanna do

Rated: 4.0 / 5 

Music Listened to and Music Felt 

I remember watching a Crank Lucas video on how we listened to music then vs how we listen to it now.

It got me thinking about the music I hear on a regular basis and the music I actually listen to, and what makes the difference. I think the difference is that- feeling the music- is listening transcended. It’s when the kick drum becomes your heartbeat, the bass mimics the rhythm of your breath. It’s when the hi hats or claps or snares coincide with your blinks. 

In a similar piece we did a while ago on Music Heard and Music Felt, Eric talked about how he marks the passage of time with music. How a song can stir nostalgia for a time in your life when everything was rose gold and purple hued, or when everything was shot to shit.

For example: the humid and rainy month I spent in Kilifi digging up trees and dancing in the dimly lit night with dogs at my feet, watching the sun set over the creek every night and slowly seep into my tent at dusk; the month two tiny ants nearly killed me with anaphylactic shock. That month is marked by ‘One Last Thing‘ by Clams Casino and ‘Mr. Flava‘ by Katchafire.

A couple of days ago, I came home from a short but perspective changing trip to Nairobi, I sat on a balcony with the sun hitting me square in the face and listened to ‘Walking in the Sun‘ by Fink. It’s the kind of hymn that made my Sunday morning all the more spiritual. I felt the ash of his trials in the gravel in his humming. I wiped the sweat from my brow and thanked God for the day, whoever he or she might be. At that moment, as I felt the chapter in my life change, the song wove itself through me, through my skin, tissue and bone. I listened to Fink and felt what he felt, through the lens of my own life.

Even a blind man can tell when he’s walking in the sun.

Meanwhile, in a backyard somewhere in Lavington, as the sun slowly crept away from the city, ‘Wish You Were Here‘ by Pink Floyd strummed its way through the garden and splattered itself across the orange sky. I wanted to speak but I couldn’t, the song had thickened the air, moistened my lips and dried my throat. It spoke for me and said the things I could never say but wished I could, and from the look in his eyes, he must have known this already.

We’re just two lost souls
Swimming in a fish bowl
Year after year

Running over the same old ground
What have we found?
The same old fears

Wish you were here

Sitting on a cold wooden floor on a pleasant afternoon, Harry Belafonte crooned to Juanita, his ‘Sweetheart from Venezuela‘. But what at first felt like a sweet calypso to a true love quickly became patronizing and misogynistic, at a closer listen. It threw the whole vibe of the song off. I still danced, but with a pinch of salt. I don’t care if its 1961, no señor means no, señor.

And late at night, as the temperature dropped with each passing hour, after everyone had gone to sleep and the night was as silent as could be for a city that never sleeps- ‘Molasses‘ by Hiatus Kaiyote crackled on vinyl, more poignant than ever. Things are a lot more profound at 4am.

I listened: it told me to relish in the present moment. That moment, 4 am under a snug blanket somewhere in the heart of Nairobi, feeling like everything I want and would ever need was within arm’s reach. Throw me your serene beaches, your kawaii rustic cottages, the flowery meadows, there was no where else I would have chosen to be other than there. In that moment. 4 am. Snug in love. With myself. 
As Nai Palm sang, I felt the love flow down my throat like a glass of iced lemon grass tea, soothing any anxiety I had for tomorrow and the general future. Through Hiatus Kaiyote, I learnt about the art of letting go: letting go of control, letting go of attachments that no longer serve me- attachments to things, to people. I learnt to take the moment and enjoy it for what it is at that given space and time. With every note plucked, I felt myself getting lighter; as if a boulder had dropped from my back and I realized I had wings all along, and I could fly.

It could be a compass, rare and so bountiful
It could be the opposing opinion
It could be the point of traction bound to all
It could be the point of letting it go.

I listened to it. I felt it. And it changed my life. I think that’s the difference.

 

An Introduction to NJOMZA 

NJOMZA is sad for you. That’s a double entrendre: sad for you because she feels sorry for you, sad for you because she misses you.
Pronounced nee-yohm-zah. You might recognize her as the sultry female vocals on ‘My Favorite Part’ off Mac Miller’s last project, ‘The Divine Feminine’

Her debut EP, Sad for you is airy and light but heavy at the same time.

She starts it off by declaring war against her feelings in ‘Intro’.

Fuck these emotions, I don’t need them

People switch up like the seasons

The title track, ‘Sad for you’ is unlike anything I’ve ever heard. It’s dismissive yet sensitive. It’s recognizing the need to evolve and grow, with or without this other person.

‘Poison’ is simple and minimalist. She equates a toxic relationship to a car crash, to a bombing, to suicide by poison. She pulls herself out because she knows she still has too much to live for.

‘Perfect Fit’ is looking at you with bedroom eyes, slurring its words slightly as it invites you in. It’s 4 am and promises whispered between sweet and salty nothings.

‘Baggage’ feels like the child of Amy Winehouse and Jorja Smith. A sole horn blowing soul, it uses the same jazz elements as those in The Divine Feminine.  It’s when reality hits you and you see a person for what they are instead of what you want them to be.

NJOMZA breathes rhythm and soul, light and darkness, and a sprinkle of personal glitter into this project, and she’s only just getting started.

Rated : 3.8 / 5

The Black Femme Fatale 

When the word ‘savage’ comes up, you probably won’t think of her first. You would probably think of the male bravado rapper, wissa knife tattoo on his forehead and Google image results of mug shots from different angles.

That’s okay. She doesn’t brandish her knife on her forehead, her weapons are concealed but boy, do they cut deep and clean.

It did not start when Beyonce sat us down and calmly explained to us that girls run the world. However, it might have started when Beyonce became Sasha Fierce. No. When Beyonce became Foxy Cleopatra. Or when Missy Elliot and Janet Jackson addressed that ‘Son of a Gun’. Or when En Vogue elaborated that “No. You’re never gonna get it.” .

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Whenever it started, whoever it started with- the black femme fatal has been a cultural staple in music for years.

She is not to be confused with the carefree black girl,  The black femme fatale is just as whimsical as she is sinister. It’s Rihanna in ‘Bitch Better Have My Money’. It’s Sza in ‘Love Galore’. Kehlani in ‘Distraction’.

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The black femme fatale is not to be taken lightly, She is the proverbial woman scorned that hell hath no fury like. She will use and discard you with an angelic smile on her pretty face, with no apology. Do not, I repeat, Do. Not. Cross. Her.

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Key features of the archetypal female include:

-Mischief, boredom or hunger.

-Leather or latex.

-Past or present scorn that she emerged from the ashes of like a Phoenix.

-Quentin Tarantino heavy breathing.

Dej Loaf summed it up pretty well back in 2014:

Let a nigga try me, try me
I’m a get his whole mothafuckin’ family
And I ain’t playin wit nobody
Fuck around and I’m a catch a body

The black femme fatale is the female praying mantis devouring her lover post-coitus. She’s emotionally needy and insecure and fiercely independent at the same time. Affectionate and emotionally unavailable. Warm and inviting, cold and cruel. She is the reason hurricanes are named after women.

Here’s a playlist for the next time you’re feeling devious and maybe a bit violent too:

  1. Serena – Dreezy ft. Dej Loaf

2. Son of a Gun – Janet Jackson ft. Missy Elliot

3. Never Gonna Get It– En Vogue

4. Pull up– Abra

5. Distraction – Kehlani

Colours 2: PARTYNEXTDOOR 

Like a gift from the divine, Partynextdoor  has blessed us undeserving mortals with a masterful unannounced release, Colors 2, a sequel to his 2014 EP- Pnd Colours. 

And colour your life it will. This late night themed 4-track EP cuts you like a knife, straight in the middle, all the way down. Murder by music. 

It will feel like your ear drums were massaged by delicate hands. It’s an experience that feels like you are literally entering him, stepping inside the dark seedy alley that is the mind and soul of Jahron B. Music and cigarette smoke wafts out of the back entrances to clubs, a curvy high class escort in a trench coat winks as she saunters past you.

He’s always trying to find the evasive truth with her. Whoever ‘her’ at the time may be.
I’m gonna jump straight to my favorite song on the project,  ‘Low Battery’, and bitch a little about it because I know if this track was Drake’s – and it easily could have been considering Party is his favorite little OVO elf- it would have hit the billboard top 10, seconds after release. Although, I do relish in the pleasure that comes with seeing gold before the others do.

‘Low Battery’ is a thumpy jiggy beat that will have your body involuntarily gyrating. Lyrics wise: It reads like 2 am texts to the person who is about to shatter you and your heart into pieces.

What you tryna do? Are you tryna hurt my ego?
Look you know it’s usually on a hunnid
But babe, right now it’s on a zero

In ‘Rendezvous’, like his thoughts and drums are staggering on whisky, he asks her to stop playing games and fucking say what she wants. He’s not impressed.

Among other tracks is ‘Peace of Mind’ and I can’t help but draw comparisons to Kehlani’s, ‘Piece of Mind’ off her album, Sweetsexysavage.

The first time I ever listened to  Partynextdoor and felt his mood, I swore to be celibate and save my secondary virginity for him. Because that’s what he is, Partynextdoor is not an artist or his songs, Partynextdoor is a mood. There’s a reason #partygetsmewetter.

Let him wine and dine you, light the chocolate scented candles, and sprinkle the rose petals on the sheets. Resistance is futile.

 

(Rated : 4.4 / 5) 

Everybody: Logic

Life. What’s it all about?

In this project, Logic raps from several perspectives. Logic is everybody, everybody is him. We follow Kai and Thomas where they left off last album, on their trek through Paradise, as Logic serves not only as their walking music, but also as their existential reference guide.

Next, we meet Atom, who dies in a car crash at the end of ‘Hallelujah’ and finds himself in purgatory with Neil DeGrasse Tyson God. God informs poor Atom that he’s dead, lets him freak out over that fact a little and then they go in to discuss the meaning of life and existence as we know it. Cue Logic.

Logic confronts the conflict he’s always had with being biracial in a world that’s either white or black. He sees the inequality of it all and he doesn’t understand because these two unequal sides are literally two equal sides of him.

Damn, my skin fair but life’s not

He doesn’t understand why people are so cruel; why they mistreat each other like our differences are irreconcilable. Why can’t we just let people live and do whatever they want so long as it doesn’t hurt anyone?  Why can’t we all just get along and exist together?

The bottom line is love and self acceptance because if you can’t love and accept yourself for who you are, who will? All it takes is a butterfly effect and you could easily have been him and she could have been you.

Atom: So what now? What advice can you give me ?
God: What advice can I give humanity?
Atom: I suppose so
God: Live your life. Don’t waste your days on the negative energy of others. Remember that you’re not your salary. You’re not your house. You’re not your car. And no matter how big your bank account is, your grave is six feet under just like everyone else’s. So enjoy the days you have. Worry not bout the days that came before you. Nor the ones that will follow you in death. Remember that right here in this moment is all you are guaranteed, and the fact that you are living is what life is all about. So live your life to the fullest, according to your happiness and the betterment of all

 

“1-800-273-8255”  is the phone number for the USA National Suicide Hotline and the title of a song sung from the perspective of someone who’s hit rock-bottom and feels like they do not have the strength to crawl out. Life is hard, especially for the living, but sunrise is never too far away. Somehow, someway, it always gets better. Please don’t give up. (Featuring Khalid and Alessia Clare)

About ‘Black Spider-Man’ Donald Glover should be spider man. Idris Elba should be James Bond. That’s it. I don’t understand why these things haven’t happened yet.

“Afric-Aryan” sums up the theme of the album and is the fireworks that shine the light on how good of a lyricist Logic actually is. Featuring another Afric-Aryan rapper- Clue: he went double platinum with no features.

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Although it sounds all over the place and somewhat defensive sometimes: It’s true that Logic can pass for straight up Caucasian so that may have given him some white privilege but that’s not the point. Remember, at the end of the day, it’s Logic’s story to tell. Not mine nor yours but in a sense too, ours – it’s everybody’s. And it does what it’s meant to do: It makes us feel okay about not feeling okay.

Please make Childish spider-man.

Rated : 4.1 / 5 

 

001 Experiments: Lou Phelps 

It’s great when you get buddy beats from a Grammy nominated dj/producer, but it must suck being known as Kaytranada’s baby brother who raps. 

He’s on a mission to establish himself and to differentiate himself from all the other average rappers. 

He discusses a night of debauchery  with Innanet James in ‘What Time is it?’ . He recalls empty venues, and getting booed off stages in Austin. Lou Phelps is on his come up and boy, isn’t the come up hard. He carries on, he knows the grind is worth it. 

As usual Kaytranada’s touch on this is reminiscent of sunny days and boom boxes and running around fire hydrants. 

Rated: 3.2 / 5

This Old Dog Went Rolling Home: Mac DeMarco 

Music to rock back and forth to. This Old Dog feels like a physical journey. Like a late afternoon drive in a tired old pick up, through strawberry fields. Mac DeMarco is taking you from one place to another. 
So mellow it will melt you in your carpet (or bed, or seat. Wherever you’re listening from, I just happen to be listening from a carpet). Like a 28 year old Elton John, like he’s trying to tell us that he’s the only living boy in New York. 

It feels like he’s  aged 20 years since we last saw him. I bet it’s all those cigarettes. See how in ‘My Old Man’, even he’s surprised by how much older he feels, how much more like his father he’s become. 

The genre of this album is Dad-core. That’s the general theme of this album: fathers. He sees himself resembling the father he never had, walking his own hand. He gives advice to himself in the sage doting way a dad would to his son. 

However, if you miss wishy washy slack guitar Mac DeMarco listen to ‘Still Beating’.  It is Hawaiian nostalgia, a middle school dance with slow rotating disco lights and shiny sequins. He’s comfortable in his long term relationship, he’s apologizing for the songs he sang that hurt her , reassuring her that he loves her just the same as he always has. This one vaguely resembles like Salad days Mac. 

He’s honest. That’s something about Mac that no one can ever take a shit on. They say the best music carries the most pain, Mac DeMarco reflects like someone who’s used to the pain of digging under his skin on the regular; someone who frequently asks himself the question ‘how do I really feel?’ 

He’s always dispensing sage advice like in ‘Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing’ “with the bluesiest harmonica. Fuck going outside. You really don’t have to socialize with people you don’t want to. 
In ‘Dreams from Yesterday’ Chase your dreams or you’ll regret it when you’re as old as him. 28 is the new 82.

(Rated: 3.2 / 5) 

Free 6lack

Isn’t it every young musician’s ambition to get noticed by a label and signed? For the world to finally know what they’re capable of? To taste stardom on the tip of their tongues?

Unfortunately, it doesn’t always work out this way. You’ve heard of record labels being compared to satan’s shackles: it’s Michael Jackson unabashedly calling the head of Sony Music Entertainment, Tony Mottola, ‘the devil’. It’s when Prince changed his name to an unpronounceable symbol (the man formerly known as prince) in order to get out of his contract with Warner Brothers. It’s Frank Ocean buying back all his masters.

6lack (pronounced Black) felt imprisoned. His record label had him in chains for 5 years until he finally broke free. Now he has full creative control of his art. As if the album title Free 6lack didn’t say it loud enough, he’s a free man.

The music is much like the artist : a moody and introspective enigma; a black and white instagram filter in real life.

‘Prblems’ is the song that saw him break into the mainstream. Smokey dark bass, trap hats and an honesty that borders on rude. He narrates his situation of being unable to focus on another person because he’s too busy focusing on his goals. The indecision of wanting to be with someone and wanting to be alone. Also, you can’t change a person.

Tell her you love her when next week you just want your space
Why you do, why you do that?
Tell her you want her but next week you do your own thing
Why you do, why you do that?

The flow is crazy on ‘Never know.’

Yeah, nigga this flow is crazy

He basically answers the question ‘how do you make it in this business?’ by talking about what he did: a little bit of self discipline and individuality can go a long way, young grasshopper. Pave your own roads.

In the final track ‘Alone/End’, I did a double take at my speakers because for a moment there I thought I was listening to Ocean. 6lack sings and talks to us and well, he says a lot.

I know that but being around…in that atmosphere and seeing how people move, you know, seeing how, how they make records, you know, what kind of record they make…I’m just like…I don’t want this shit for myself and I don’t ever want niggas to try to pull me into that. ‘Cause I’ve been told a couple times like, “Hey, do this shit man, do that…” And I’m like man, I don’t want, I don’t that for me man.
And if I keep tellin’ y’all I don’t want that shit for me and y’all keep, you know, tryna nudge and push…I understand y’all got your vision and y’all got your formula but that shit don’t work for me man. I’m not gonna conform, I’m not settling for that shit. ‘Cause if I do it once and it pop, I’ma have to keep doing that shit over and over again. You can’t build no fanbase like that. You…you become, you become, you become a fuckin’ song instead of a person. That shit…I’m not…I’m not tryna be that man.

This song wins the award for catchiest and smoothest hook. Furthermore, he reinforces the sage old Ocean adage of Be yourself. Let nothing or nobody confine you.

Here’s to being free.

Rated: 4.4 / 5

( Image : Album Art. Lyrics : Genius )